Seven Weeks

My Urologist and my Radiation Oncologist agree the prostate cancer has returned.  My options appear to be:

  1. Do nothing – and probably enjoy 10 years before quality of life issues become apparent.
  2. Wait, watch, and maybe do something later. PSA will sometimes increase and hover around 0.2 for a long time with no real problems.
  3. I can have targeted radiation treatments now.

Improving my likelihood of long-term survival, and the fact that I am currently employed and have fairly good insurance are good reasons to act now (although the Multiple Myeloma – or the unexpected – could change my circumstances at any time).  The only negative my Radiation Oncologist listed (other than the ever-lurking unexpected or unlikely) is before the treatments are finished, I should expect to experience some inconvenient bathroom related issues.  These symptoms usually subside after the treatments have ended.

The Radiation Oncologist explained that when prostate cancer returns, it’s usually found in one of three places: the old prostate neighborhood, the lymph nodes, or the bones.  Since they know historically it’s in the prostate area 75% of the time, that is where I will receive daily radiation treatments for seven weeks.  I returned to the Cancer Center in Beaverton where seven years ago, I had 24 daily treatments not realizing it was a rehearsal.  I was mapped, scanned, and tattooed (again).  The treatments and commuting will begin on April 18th.

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This was seven years ago, the last day of my 24 treatments.  I wonder how much radiation exposure my technician has accumulated.

On the positive side – I signed up a couple weeks ago for the second annual Chubby Bunny Challenge, a weight loss competition at work.  I joined it to be involved and supportive, and for the $20 sign-up fee, you get a nice T-shirt and Pizza.  Last year I actually lost six pounds.  With my previous radiation treatments, I lost 30 pounds.  This year I may have a pretty good chance of winning first prize!