Multiple Myeloma – Kill The Root Kill the Cancer,  Dr. Rodger Tiedemann Has Found the Root

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Dr. Robert Tiedemann was the featured speaker at the July 8th Cure Panel Broadcast.  You can listen to a rebroadcast if you CLICK HERE.  Nick Van Dyk provided a summary of the broadcast if you CLICK HERE.

Dr. Roger Tiedemann is a scientist at the Ontario Cancer Institute and a hematologist specializing in multiple myeloma and lymphoma within the division of Medical Oncology and Hematology at the Princess Margaret Cancer Center and is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto with appointments from the Department of Medical Biophysics and in the Department of Medicine. Dr. Tiedemann is a New Zealand-trained hematologist and fellow of both the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia.  He is an author of a US patent application for a new cell cycle therapeutic. His research focus includes multiple myeloma stems, progenitor cells, genomics and the development of new therapeutic strategies for myeloma based on an understanding of the tumor biology.

A brief explanation of his work can be found at the following link: http://www.uhn.ca/corporate/ForMedia/PressReleases/Pages/Rodger_Tiedemann_Myeloma_Relapse.aspx

In this publication they write, “Clinical researchers at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have discovered why multiple myeloma, an incurable cancer of the bone marrow, persistently escapes cure by an initially effective treatment that can keep the disease at bay for up to several years.The reason, explains research published online today in Cancer Cell, is intrinsic resistance found in immature progenitor cells that are the root cause of the disease – and relapse – says principal investigator Dr. Rodger Tiedemann, a hematologist specializing in multiple myeloma and lymphoma at the Princess Margaret, University Health Network (UHN). Dr. Tiedemann is also an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto.

The research demonstrates that the progenitor cells are untouched by mainstay therapy that uses a proteasome inhibitor drug (“Velcade”) to kill the plasma cells that make up most of the tumour. The progenitor cells then proliferate and mature to reboot the disease process, even in patients who appeared to be in complete remission.

“Our findings reveal a way forward toward a cure for multiple myeloma, which involves targeting both the progenitor cells and the plasma cells at the same time,” says Dr. Tiedemann. “Now that we know that progenitor cells persist and lead to relapse after treatment, we can move quickly into clinical trials, measure this residual disease in patients, and attempt to target it with new drugs or with drugs that may already exist. 

I think you will find this of great interest, I know the panel is.   Good luck and may God Bless your Cancer Journey.   For more information on multiple myeloma survival rates and treatments CLICK HERE and you can follow me on twitter at: https://twitter.com/grpetersen1